Multiply your book’s sales by turning your book into 6

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Here’s how that works.

Let’s say that you have written a book that is 240 body-copy pages long, excluding the front matter, table of contents, bio, and index.

Let’s also say that before you wrote the book you created an outline. That outline included an intro/explanation chapter, four systems chapters (each including a different concept and example), and a roll-out chapter that took the four concepts and told how they would work with other information dissemination means, either individually or by working together.

That sounds kind of vague, doesn’t it? Here’s an example that might be easier to envision. (I plan my books first, then write.) Its title is How to Sell 75+ of Your Freelance Writing Almost All of the Time.

While the book’s contents aren’t related to this blog, its Table of Contents below shows where the six ebooks might come from. It also shows how all of the book(s)—a major paperback of 240+ pages and six ebooks, each from a chapter or section of that paperback—should multiply your total earning power with only about 50-75% more time spent in the ebooks’ preparation, rather than 600% that six books might suggest.

Here’s a tentative Table of Contents of my coming book:

How to Sell 75+ of Your Freelance Writing Almost All of the Time
Introduction
1. Why just sell your writing (idea) once? Why not sell it again and again, then once more—and once again…?
2. Magazines and Newspapers: two magic systems with lots of sales in each
3. Books: sell the original in 11 different formats and each of those in six ebooks
4. Niche Publishing: where the gold is hiding in book publishing
5. Topic-spoking: one idea exploded, then filtered through the hungriest buyers
6. The roll-out: once the copy exists, why not make a lot more money from the idea by six other non-print information dissemination means?

It never happens that the 240 pages of your paperback’s content are evenly divided into six equal sections of 40 pages each. But my first thought is six books of 40 pages each. (I call these shorties wee ebooks.)

Still, 40 pages to me seems small, and once the six topics are separated from each other and pulled apart, they could easily be expanded into 50 or 60 pages apiece (perhaps by adding an additional example or two in each book). It’s your choice. You can make your wee ebooks as long as you want; they are your books and length isn’t anti-environmental or anti-anything, as long as the copy and concepts are tight and professional.

You might take the six chapters in my book above, extract each, and massage it into a stand-alone small book. It can include the same examples (or different ones) and almost the same prose as the original book. Just prune out links, references, and extraneous resources if they aren’t about this specific topic. Refer to the big book a couple of times, where appropriate, just as you would other books or support data. Also, include information about the big book and all of the other five wee ebooks on a page or so in or near the resources in the back.

After all, you’re publishing this wee ebook in part to direct its readers to good, related information and guidance in your big (or mother) book. So make its existence obvious, but don’t overdo it. The other reasons you are making it available are that (1) it confines itself to a specific subject offered in an easy-to-use, inexpensive edition, (2) it puts more published books in your featherchest, which can be very important if you wish to display your expertise in the topic and to speak about it, (3) it pays you additional money for your having shared clear, usable information—without huge amounts of energy and for very little additional expense.

How might this multiply your earnings? You will promote the big book, so it will bring in an usual book’s expected sales income. You can also promote the other five wee ebooks at the same time (since each book’s title must be different or you will drive sellers and buyers nuts), and that will pick up more buyers. The two books will excite different clientele at different buy levels.

Let’s say that you will sell your paperback at $17.95 (also test $19.95 and $24.95). And that you will sell each of the six wee ebooks at $3.99 each (though run it as a special now and then at $2.99). And, as mentioned, you will also promote the other six books in each of these books. So, for example, if you sell the wee ebook about Magazine and Newspaper selling, its readers may also be interested in another wee ebook, say about Books. And if they see that they now have a third (two slightly modified chapters) of the big book, they may well then buy the big book too—or recommend it to friends based on the solid content and writing quality of the wee books they have already read.

Another point: consider issuing the wee book as both an ebook and a paperback. Or test just one in both formats to see if there is more interest in having it in one form or the other. (In my field I find that writers usually want print-on-paper books rather than ebooks, so it would indeed be worth my testing both formats.)

And also that you will focus on the social media to promote the wee ebooks as much as the big book, plus of course list all of the books as widely as you can through the “open” publishers.

That’s it.

Best wishes,

Gordon Burgett

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