Category: novel writing

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14 key ebook publishing tips

Mark Coker started Smashwords when a quarter of 1% of U.S. books sold were ebooks. Now it’s 35% of the total, and he’s a top spokesman in the field. Last year Smashwords authors sold ebooks worth $30-million at retail. Last Saturday (11/8/14) Coker spoke to BAIPA (Bay Area Independent Publisher Association) in Novato, CA (near […]

25 blogs about Kindle, Nook, Create Space, LSI, Smashwords

I was asked what blogs I had about “open” publishing. Here they are, below, and I’m certain there are more too so if you have a specific word or topic you are hunting for, please type it in the search box to see if it pops up! The publishers mentioned in the blogs are Kindle, […]

How to convert your book file into ePub format—fast and free!

So here you are with a dandy book that millions of hungry readers want to buy and hide on their tablets, readers, or computers—but you can’t get it from Word (.doc or .docx) or other formats into .ePub. You probably want to use .ePub to post your book with an “open” publisher like Kobo or […]

Monday March 10th, 2014 in articles, Blurb, digital publishing, e-publishing, editing, fiction, iPad, Kindle, Lightning Source, LSI, Lulu, Nook, novel writing, open publishing, product development, publishing, self-publishing, small publishers, Smashwords, webmarketing, writing | Comments Off on How to convert your book file into ePub format—fast and free!

How to share the heart of your book 35 ways in Twitter, Facebook, and Linkedin each!

Sometimes you write a book or some copy that lends itself to being edited into

Thursday January 2nd, 2014 in articles, Blurb, book title, digital publishing, e-publishing, editing, fiction, iPad, Kindle, Lightning Source, LSI, Lulu, niche publishing, Nook, novel writing, open publishing, product development, proofreading, self-publishing, small publishers, Smashwords, webmarketing, writing | Comments Off on How to share the heart of your book 35 ways in Twitter, Facebook, and Linkedin each!

Your book needs final, professional proofreading…

What will kill a reader’s fervor fastest? Misspellings, punctuation errors, endless paragraphs, no flow, and nonsense. If somebody asks another, “How was ____ (your) book?” and they respond, “I couldn’t get into it. He can’t spell.” Or they say, “It didn’t make any sense…,” you probably lost that potential reader forever. So you need a […]

What’s so special about your book’s second draft?

This is what I consider the final-write draft, with (almost) all of the last changes inserted in the file so it can get its final proofreading. Be generous with changes, improvements, double-checked research, interviews, and so on. Last chance to make your book hum. (But don’t dally forever either.) I recall reading Dick Perry (in […]

Which sells best: major houses, ebook, or self-publishing?

“What kind of book do you want to sell?” has to be the first question. I’m interested here in nonfiction. That’s because self-publishers don’t publish fiction. It’s almost impossible for them to sell, and I want to compare all three since we can now dip into all three ponds, two directly and the third by […]

Test your book with experts after you’ve finished the first draft

Your book has been written, you have given it a no-nonsense proofing, and it’s just about ready to go to your paid (final) proofreader so it will be properly and correctly written before you submit it for printing. Letting others read your book at this stage is controversial, but probably wise if it’s your first […]

What you must do to properly finish your book’s first draft…

In most of the past dozen or so posts in this blog we have been talking about writing and publishing your own book quickly and properly. And we’re near the gathering, formatting, and end-road prepping of your tome before it is given a last-step review and is submitted to print. It’s like a new home […]

Copyright? Using others’ words or artwork in your book.

To avoid the whole issue just read or hear what others say and retell it in your words. That would be the text of your book. But there can be wee pitffalls. If you are quoting them directly, you must tell the reader who they are, and usually the context of the statement. Others often […]