Insider secrets of making money with e-books

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Since this is where I share responses or comments from my free monthly newsletter, I’m very pleased to share the following from Bob Bly, who I think is the best example of making a newsletter work and producing e-books that are honest, advice-full, and worth far more than he charges. (See www.bly.com.)

Here’s what just appeared in Bob’s newest newsletter:

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Insider secrets of making money with e-books

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Gordon Burgett is one of the founding fathers of “how to build your information empire.” In his most recent newsletter, he published a 48-point checklist of tips and ideas on making money by writing and selling e-books online.

To get the free newsletter and read the checklist, click below now:

www.gordonburgett.com/free-reports

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Bob is referring to the review I made of both state-of-the-art and future directions the digital download world is taking, in the 7-1-09 newsletter. (I focus on affiliation in the issue due out on 8-4-09.) If you subscribe (all free), you will receive an archive of this past year’s missives.

(Incidentally, I will address two of Bob’s e-books that I particularly like in a short e-mail to subscribers on 8-17.)

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More information about e-publishing, and a contact…

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(An e-mail response to my newsletter that I thought you might enjoy sharing.)

Dear Mr. Burgett

Just read your article on e-publishing. Our first book, 31 Months in Japan: The Building of a Theme Park , was published in hardbound, paperback and e-book formats in 2005.

We joined EPIC (the Electronic Published Internet connection) at that time, and the book was a finalist in their annual contest.

Since you appear to be interested in e-publishing, you might want to join EPIC (www.epicauthors.com). Their newsgroups are great sources of information on all aspects of the current publishing market, not limited to the electronic portion. We welcome all those who are considering e-publishing, whether authors, editors, publishers, marketers, agents or others in the industry.

The market for e-publishing has changed dramatically in the past two years or so. Our own royalties are highest for the Kindle version of that first book, mostly because we retained the rights and converted our own digital content into the Kindle format–a real pain in the neck but well worth it. If your books are not yet on Kindle, please consider this enormous emerging market. (Kindle is the 1000-pound gorilla at the moment, but Sony and others are scrambling to catch up.)

We both personally read our e-books on our old Palm Pilots. Larry covets the new Kindle, and he might just end up with one in his stocking at Christmas.

If you have any other questions about e-publishing, please let us know. All of our books are available as e-books as well as in paperback. And our current publisher started as an e-publisher and added print afterward.

Lorna and Larry Collins

Read about our books 31 Months in Japan: The Building of a Theme Park, Snowflake Secrets, Seasons of Love, and Murder
www.lornalarry.com

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Comments and selected items for small publishers from “Digital Platforms and Technologies for Publishers”

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My newsletter released on July 2 contains about seven pages of comments and selected key points for small publishers about digital publishing and the future.

Almost all of it is provoked by Steve Paxhia and Bill Tripp’s excellent report (sponsored by Follett) called “Digital Platforms and Technologies for Publishers: Implementation Beyond ‘eBook’.”

My question, for my free subscribers, was how does what was said in the 148 pages directly affect those of us with a book-a-month or less production schedule? And what does it do to our ink-on-paper world?

The potential changes are both extraordinarily exciting and flat-out overwhelming. But the sales in digital in 2008 was just 10% of the total. And much of the report focuses on XML and publishing behemoths. So it took some imagination and sleuthing to see where we fit in at all.

Still, 46 sections (mostly long paragraphs) gives us specific guidelines, insight into where the big houses are going, clues about some super ways to chip off some spin-off income, and some great future planning tools that will still keep us in the game–and, done with guerilla finesse, might even let us leap ahead!

Sign up for the newsletter (it’s free and monthly), take a good read, and if it’s not for you later, just unsubscribe. You’ll get three very useful (also free) reports in the process.

Best wishes,

Gordon Burgett

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